How to Help a Young Child Get Ready for School

schoolKidsStarting a new school year can be stressful for children of all ages, but especially for the very young. There are things parents can do, however, to help ease a child’s transition from a carefree summer to a structured school-day, including:

  • Implementing a school-year sleeping schedule before the school starts, so that the child gets used to going to bed earlier than during the summer and getting up at a designated time
  • Building excitement about the new school year by talking with the child about the new things he/she will learn in school and about the new children she/he will meet.
  • Talking with the child about any concerns he/she might have about going to school.
  • Visiting the school to introduce the child to his/her new classroom and teacher.
  • Reassuring the child that if he/she needs you while in school, you will be there.

The Salvation Army Takes 200 Children Shopping for Back-To-School Supplies, Clothes

schoolBooksIt will be a happy end to the summer for 200 grade school children (K-sixth grade) when they go shopping for back-to-school clothes and supplies—courtesy of The Salvation Army and Target Inc.As part of the back-to-school program, Target awarded The Salvation Army in ten markets across the U.S. with a $25,000 grant, which included $20,000 worth of Target GiftCards for the shopping sprees, and an additional $5,000 to cover transportation and other administration expenses. More than 80 Target stores will participate in the one-day event in select markets including Minneapolis/St. Paul, Chicago, Detroit, Los Angeles, the San Francisco Bay Area, Dallas, Miami, New York, Baltimore/Washington, D.C. and Seattle.The day of the shopping trip, each child will be presented with a $100 Target GiftCard to use at seven participating Target stores in the Greater Chicago area and a Target store in Munster, Indiana.Children will be paired with chaperones who will help them with their purchasing decisions and monitor how much is being spent and on what by each child. Stores will treat children to snacks and, for those children who finish their shopping early, there’ll be games for them to play.

Stay cool Chicagoland…cooling center list for the State of Illinois.

For a list of cooling centers in the State of Illinois, visit:  http://www.keepcool.illinois.gov/coolingcenters.cfmKeeping Cool Tips for Everyone

  • Stay in air-conditioned space at home, the library, the mall, movie theater or at a cooling center.
  • Drink lots of water and natural juices. Avoid alcoholic beverages, coffee and colas.
  • Keep shades drawn and blinds closed, but keep windows slightly open.
  • Stay out of the sun and avoid going out in the heat.
  • Keep electric lights off or turned down.
  • Take cool baths or showers.
  • Wear loose, light cotton clothing.
  • Do not eat heavy meals. Avoid cooking with your oven.
  • Avoid or minimize physical exertion.
  • Do not sit in a hot car, even for a short time. Never leave a child in a hot car.
  • Check on family members, friends and neighbors to make sure they stay cool and safe.
  • If you or anyone you know needs emergency medical attention, call 911.
  • It is against the law to open a fire hydrant. An open hydrant hinders the fire department’s ability to fight fires, reduces water pressure in your home and may cause basement flooding.

Special Keeping Cool Tips for Seniors

  • During heat emergencies, seniors are urged to contact their local area agencies on Aging or the Senior HelpLine at (800) 252-8966 for assistance with locating senior centers, adult day service sites and other buildings that serve as cooling centers.
  • Humidity combined with temperature make up the heat index, which is similar to the wind chill factor in winter. If the temperature is in the 90s with high humidity, it can feel like it is well over 100 degrees.

Keeping Cool Tips for Your Pets

  • Provide water and shelter from the sun at all times.
  • Restrict activity during extreme heat.
  • Never leave pets in parked vehicles. Even moderate heat rapidly increases and can kill the pet quickly.

Information courtesy of http://www.keepcool.illinois.gov

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